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Research, Policy and Practice

Table 3 Focus groups’ weighting of consumption coping strategies

From: Characterising food insecurity in pastoral and agro-pastoral communities in Uganda using a consumption coping strategy index

Code Strategy ‘Weight’ (perceived severity of food insecurity circumstances)
   Agro-pastoral Pastoral
1 Eat less preferred but less expensive foodsa 6 5
2 Borrow fooda 3 2
3 Beg for food from a friend or relative 3 5
4 Purchase food on credit 3 3
5 Gather wild food plants or hunt 6 5
6 Harvest immature crops 1 5
7 Provide labour in exchange for food 3 3
8 Provide labour for income to buy food instead of preparing own fields 6 3
9 Consume seed stock held for the next season 6 5
10 Slaughter livestock and preserve meat 1 5
11 Sell calves to buy food 1 2
12 Sell breeding cows to buy food 6 5
13 Sell other cattle types to buy food 1 2
14 Sell other livestock to buy food 1 2
15 Sell assets to buy food 6 5
16 Send household members to eat elsewhere 6 5
17 Send household members to beg/fend for themselves 6 5
18 Limit portion size at meal timesa 3 3
19 Restrict consumption of adults in order for small children to eata 3 3
20 Feed working members of HH at the expense of non-working members 1 2
21 Ration the money available and buy pre-cooked food 3 3
22 Reduce the number of meals eaten in a daya 3 3
23 Skip entire days without eating 6 5
24 Barter (exchange an item for food) 6 5
25 Send children out to labour and earn to buy food 6 5
26 Send girl children for early marriage 6 5
27 Reduce the number of people in the household, e.g. send to a relative 6 5
  1. The maximum possible weight was 6 for agro-pastoralists and 5 for pastoralists; the minimum weight was 1 and 2, respectively (details in Table 2). aCore behaviours broadly comparable across contexts